Quick Answer: Are there any cultural or historical events that Jackson the author might be commenting on in the story the lottery?

What historical event is the lottery based on?

Written in the wake of World War II, Jackson’s “The Lottery” reflects the concept of the Juden as a scapegoat for economic problems in pre-war Germany. Of course, the many acts against humanity that were committed with a populace that turned a blind-eye to them or was afraid…

What is Jackson saying about tradition in the lottery?

Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” is a powerful argument against ritual and tradition. She is not arguing that all traditions and ceremonies are inherently evil. … They acknowledge that other villages are abandoning the tradition, but they adhere to it blindly, doing something because it has always been done.

What is the culture of the lottery?

The Lottery, written by Shirley Jackson, shows that Pagan culture and belief still stick to the life of the villagers in this literary work. The elements of Paganism are seen from the Lottery, the ritual, which is the heritage of ancient culture.

What inspired the lottery?

Although it is often unclear which specific authors Jackson would draw her influence from, it was evident in her writings from an early age that her inspiration came from her view that there was a hidden dark side in everyone (“Shirley Jackson Biography”).

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  What are the requirements for green card lottery?

What major world event took place prior to the story the lottery?

“The Lottery” appeared in print just after World War II, a time during which the United States began instituting the Selective Service…

What does lottery say about tradition?

Yet, subtle hints throughout the story, as well as its shocking conclusion, indicate that the villagers’ tradition has become meaningless over time. What’s particularly important about tradition in “The Lottery” is that it appears to be eternal: no one knows when it started, and no one can guess when it will end.

What message about tradition is Shirley Jackson sharing with her reader?

As the story continues, Jackson reveals her message by expecting readers to infer that while in a given society, it is difficult to see the traditions that are kept which hurt the society. The characters certainly show forms of uncomfortability, but they do not do anything about it.

How does Jackson suggest that tradition may be questioned?

How does Jackson suggest that tradition may be questioned? Some people oppose the lottery and some villages have already stopped it. A lot about the lottery has been forgotten. Old man Warner compares it to the Stone Age.

How does the lottery relate to society?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Best answer: Can I say you bet instead of you're welcome?

What does the lottery symbolize?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel.

Why is tradition bad in the lottery?

Just as the villagers in “The Lottery” blindly follow tradition and kill Tessie because that is what they are expected to do, people in real life often persecute others without questioning why. As Jackson suggests, any such persecution is essentially random, which is why Tessie’s bizarre death is so universal.