Your question: Why was the setting and tone in the lottery so important?

Why is the setting in the lottery important?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. … The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

How does the setting in the lottery impact the story?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

How did the tone and mood impact the lottery?

Shortly after the lottery commences, the peaceful setting seems menacing and ominous. As the lottery gets underway, the mood of the story also becomes anxious and unsettling. When Tessie Hutchinson’s name is called, the mood shifts to dreadful and violent as the community members prepare to stone her to death.

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How does the setting relate to the theme in the lottery?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery” takes place in a small, nondescript town located in rural America on the morning of June 27th. Jackson describes the weather on the day of the lottery as being pleasant, clear, and warm, which gives the reader a sense of tranquility and optimism.

What is the importance of the setting in The Lottery quizlet?

The story takes place on summer morning in a small town. People begin to gather in the town square between the post office and the bank. It’s a beautiful day. This setting depicts how important the lottery is in the story and how it is a big deal for everybody to gather.

How is the setting significant to the short story?

The setting of a story is important because it provides the reader with context on the time, place, and environment that the story takes place in. It is also important because it improves the reader’s experience and adds to the story’s development with plot, mood, and characters.

How does the setting of The Lottery contribute to the irony of the story?

The setting in Jackson’s “The Lottery” is ironic because what the story suggests, and what the reader expects of the setting while reading (normal village with normal people who do normal things) turns out to be untrue. … This is ironic because it is something that is totally unexpected.

How does the setting in The Lottery contribute to the story’s surprising ending?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” really helps to surprise the reader at the end of the story, because everything about the setting stands in sharp contrast to the violence that happens in the final paragraphs. The story ends with an entire community gleefully stoning a fellow community member to death.

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What type of setting does Jackson use How does that setting create a feeling or expectation for the reader?

The setting set forth by Shirley Jackson in the beginning of „The Lottery“ creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. This setting creates an image in the mind of the reader of a typical town on a normal summer day. … To begin, she tells the reader what time of day and what time of year the story takes place.

What was the mood of The Lottery?

In ‘The Lottery,’ the mood begins as light and cheerful, but shifts to tense and ominous.

What is the mood in the setting of The Lottery?

The setting in the beginning of The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson, creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. The image portrayed by the author is that of a typical town on a normal summer day. Shirley Jackson uses this setting to foreshadow an ironic ending.

How does the author create the mood in The Lottery?

The atmosphere of the short story “The Lottery” is initially normal and friendly. … The lottery was conducted—as were the square dances, the teen club, the Halloween program—by Mr. Summers. The writer manages to create the mood by portraying the townspeople as ordinary families going about a typical day.