What is the metaphor in the story The Lottery?

What is the personification in the story the lottery?

Expressions like “the wind howled” and “the brook sang” are both examples of personification. soft laughter ran through the crowd. The laughter “runs” just like Mrs. Hutchinson walks, as if it is another person in the crowd.

Why was Tessie killed in the lottery?

Tessie is stoned to death because she’s the “winner” of the lottery. The townspeople seem to believe that unless they sacrifice one of their own, crops will fail. It’s an old tradition, and very few think to question it at all.

What figurative language is used in the lottery?

With hyperbole meaning an exaggeration that is used for emphasis or effect, the entire story “The Lottery” can be considered a hyperbole.

What does the story the lottery represent?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel. The lottery has been taking place in the village for as long as anyone can remember.

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What are examples of personification?

Common Personification Examples

  • Lightning danced across the sky.
  • The wind howled in the night.
  • The car complained as the key was roughly turned in its ignition.
  • Rita heard the last piece of pie calling her name.
  • My alarm clock yells at me to get out of bed every morning.

What are the literary devices used in the story of the lottery?

Jackson used several different literary devices to support her theme that people who don’t question tradition get what they deserve. The literary devices Jackson uses to support the theme of ‘The Lottery’ are irony, foreshadowing, and pacing. To begin with, one of the literary devices Jackson uses is irony.

Does Tessie get killed in the lottery?

The unlucky loser of the lottery. Tessie draws the paper with the black mark on it and is stoned to death.

What happens to Tessie Hutchinson at the end of the story?

The woman selected by the lottery to be sacrificed, she is stoned to death by the villagers at the very end of the story. Her casual attitude as she jokes with her neighbors changes dramatically when the Hutchinson family is selected in the lottery. …

What does Tessie represent in the lottery?

What does Tessie Hutchinson symbolize in the lottery? Tessie is symbolic of the scapegoat in “The Lottery,” which is sacrificed in ritual atonement for the sins of the tribe. However, she is also an average member of the tribe who sees nothing wrong with the system until she is selected.

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What metaphors are in the lottery?

The condition of the box—worn-out, faded, stained, and splintered—is a metaphor for the lottery itself, a ritual that has long outlived its usefulness and become worn and obsolete. Although Mr. Summers talks about making a new box, nobody in the village wants to do so.

What is the imagery in the lottery?

Shirley Jackson uses imagery to convey mood in this short story. … This imagery, however, also helps to lull readers into a calm, hopeful mood; this early, pleasant mood will slowly change over to a mood of dread, menace, and horror as we learn more about what the villagers are gathered together to do.

What is the allusion in the lottery?

“The Lottery” certainly alludes to the Gospel of St. John, 8:7, in which Jesus frees an adulterous woman, directing anyone who is without sin to cast the first stone. No one throws stones at her. Unfortunately, no one in “The Lottery” rebukes the powers so forthrightly as Jesus does in John 8:7.